An Australian Photographer Making Big Waves in His Industry

This photographer captures waves in a totally gnarly way (surfer speak) that makes them the focal point of his awe-inspiring images. Ray Collins is an Australian photographer who bought his first camera a mere eight years ago (in 2007) to shoot his friends surfing around home.

Ray Collins photo waves
Source: Ray Collins’ Facebook Page

He’s since gone on to work for major companies like tech giant Apple and renowned magazines like National Geographic and adrenaline junkie Red Bull employing “his unique signature seascapes across their international campaigns.”

'Found At Sea' is a 184 page hardcover coffee table book
‘Found At Sea’ is a 184 page hardcover coffee table book

One of the most striking revelations is that Collins is colour blind, yet this hasn’t held him back in a space like photography. I suppose the worse case scenario, he could’ve just shot all his images in black and white! His published book, Found At Sea, features stunning photographs of seascapes and the first edition has already sold out. You can follow Ray on Instagram where he already has 80,000 followers.

I can’t swim nor can I surf, but I definitely want to learn; I can’t promise you I’ll be taking pictures of waves. In the video below, you get to see Collins in his element capturing nature’s most powerful element.

12 Tips to Successfully Design a Restaurant Menu

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So my first restaurant menu design project just happened to be with one of my favourite restaurants in Jamaica called Jack Sprat Restaurant. It’s an ultra cool space to hangout with great food and a great atmosphere sitting right next to the ocean; very picturesque. It also just happens to be world famous too.

When I was asked to take on this design assignment, I was extremely ecstatic because it was an opportunity for work, but more importantly it was for a place I’ve spent many hours making memories and having experiences.

Here was my approach to the project and perhaps there are a few tips in here that might be useful to you in case you too ever land a similar design job:

  1. Always remember, its a collaborative effort with your client even if they’ve given you free rein.
  2. Research as much as possible. Google is your best friend.
  3. Try to understand your client’s needs. Ask pointed questions.
  4. Find inspiration from existing menus.
  5. If the restaurant has an existing menu, look at how you can improve the entire thing.
  6. Layout is important, but (food) categorisation is integral to a well-designed menu!
  7. If a brand and identity exists for your client’s restaurant, try to preserve it in your updated design.
  8. Simplicity continues to be “…the ultimate sophistication.” (Leonardo da Vinci).
  9. Never include the dollar sign ($) or currency equivalent in front of prices; psychologically it affects the customer’s purchasing decisions.
  10. Include all the important details about the restaurant: opening hours, accepted payment methods and a back-story (optional).
  11. Imagery is a plus. Try to get some good photographs of the restaurant, food, drinks, etc.
  12. Proof read! Better yet, get a fresh pair of eyes to help you.

Good luck!

Fun Fact: Jack Sprat Restaurant was named after the famous English language nursery rhyme.

What are your best tips? Leave a comment below and keep the knowledge exchange going.